Showdown

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"Showdown" is the 20th episode of the second season of the television series How I Met Your Mother. It originally aired on April 30, 2007. The series was created by Carter Bays and Craig Thomas. This episode was directed by Pamela Fryman and written by Gloria Calderon Kellett. There are also two guest appearances: Bob Barker and Rich Fields. The main characters are:

How I Met Your Mother logo.


Context of the episode[editar]

Marshall, Lily and Ted met in college, due to Marshall and Ted were room partners. Years later, Ted met Barney and Robin, separately, in pub MacLaren's, in New York City. In this pub the gang uses to hang out.

In 2007, Marshall and Lily were engaged, they were about to celebrate their wedding. Marshall (Jason Segel) is studying law in Columbia University Law School, because he wants to work as an environmental lawyer. Lily (Alyson Hannigan) is a kindergarten teacher and an amateur artist. [1]

Ted (Josh Radnor) is working in an architecture studio, and he just dessigned his first building for a major bank and financial services company in Spokane. He's also dating Robin (Cobie Smulders), who works as a television presenter on Metro News 1.

Barney (Neil Patrick Harris), one of Ted's best friend -apart from Marshall-, uses to play with girls to sleep with them. Nobody knows how Barney makes a living.

Plot[editar]

Marshall and Lily are planning to spend the last two weeks before their wedding sleeping apart, because the rest of the group think that they are too codependent. To make it more bearable, Marshall makes a "night night" tape for Lily. For his part, Ted is trying to write a best man toast, but no one convinces Marshall because he wants to look as a good guy in front of his family, and those stories are too dirty. Meanwhile, Lily is too skinny for her wedding dress, so she has to gain weight fast. Finally, Lily fit in the dress, and thanks to the story of how she achieved it, Ted wrote a perfect toast for the occasion.

While all this was going on, Barney participated in "The Price is Right" in order to meet his father: the television host Bob Barker. He finally didn't tell Bob that he was his son. In any case, Barney gave everything he won in the contest to Marshall and Lily as a wedding gift. [2]

Things Barney Won in "The Price Is Right"[editar]

Barney makes an appearance on the game show, with the purpose of winning the Showcase and confess his identity to the host. He eventually ends up performing admirably in the game by arriving at the Showcase and winning both showcases. Just as the end credits are about to roll, Barney requests a final word. But he can't get himself to tell Bob that he's his son and ends up congratulating him for the 35 years he hosted the game and hugging him. [3]

In "The Price is Right", Barney gained:

  • Two Watches
  • A camcorder
  • A computer
  • 1 thousand dollars
  • And the two final showcases – including a dune buggy.


"Night Night Lily" tape[editar]

At the end of the episode, Ted recorded Marshall singing a "night night Lily song" to Lily, his fiancee.

Production Staff[editar]

  • Directed by: Pamela Fryman
  • Written by: Gloria Calderon Kellett
  • Coproductor: Stewart Halpern-Fingerhut
  • Associate producer: Rob Fox
  • Executive story editor: Gloria Calderon Kellett
  • Director of photography: Christian la Fountaine
  • Production designer: Steve Olson
  • Edited by Sue Federman
  • Unit production manager: Suzy Maman Greenberg
  • First assistant director: Michael Shea
  • Second assistant director: Dorothy Steinicke
  • Casting by Megan Branman, Dylann Brander
  • Score by John Swihart
  • Main title theme written and performed by "The Solids"
  • Costume designer: Julie Bennett Block
  • Dept. head make-up: Lona Jeffers
  • Dept. head hairstylist: Tena Parker-Liddiard
  • Property Master: David Baker
  • Associate director: Jim Rose
  • Set decorator: Susan Eschelbach
  • Script supervisor: Janet Kagan
  • Production coordinator: Missy Alexander
  • Script coordinator: Matt Kuhn
  • Production accountant: James Jimenez
  • Production sound: Michael L. Clark
  • Re-recording mixers: Kathy Oldham, John Bickelhaupt
  • Music supervisor: Andy Gowan
  • Post production supervisor: Stacey Wahlstrom
  • Assistants to the producers: Carl Maclaren, Jamie Adamic
  • Production Staff:
    • Bryan Dych
    • Craig Gerard
    • Jenni Hendriks
    • Erica Lutzker
    • Amy Schwartz
    • Adam Vine


Filming Aspects[editar]

Usually sitcoms are filmed on set in front of a live studio audience usually feature a central area where most of the show's activity takes place. Sometimes, it is also filmed on location, which means out of a set.

The set has three solid walls and the audience and cameras look through the open fourth wall. If a show is filmed on set without a studio audience (like in How I Met Your Mother), the fourth wall opens to cameras and an area for directors, producers, gaffers, technicians and other members of the production crew instead of a seating gallery or bleachers. A set provides a stable environment with more control over lighting, sound and continuity. Sitcoms filmed on location set up the whole production -cast, crew, props and everything- somewhere in the real world.

Sitcoms may be filmed using a single camera or multiple cameras. The single camera approach offers more control over the filming, providing the opportunity for close-up scenes, wide shots and lots of movement. The use of multiple cameras offers the opportunity to capture several angles of each scene simultaneously. [4]

Episodes were generally shot over a three-day period in the Los Angeles-based Soundstage Studio 22 and featured upwards of 50 scenes with quick transitions and flashbacks. The laugh track was later created by recording an audience being shown the final edited episode. Craig Thomas (one of the creators) claimed that shooting before a live audience would have been impossible because of the structure of the show and the numerous flashforwards in each episode and because doing so "would blur the line between 'audience' and 'hostage situation'". [5]

Referencias[editar]

  1. «Season 2». How I Met Your Mother Wiki (en inglés). Consultado el 3 de abril de 2020. 
  2. «Showdown». How I Met Your Mother Wiki (en inglés). Consultado el 3 de abril de 2020. 
  3. «Bob Barker». How I Met Your Mother Wiki (en inglés). Consultado el 3 de abril de 2020. 
  4. «How Sitcoms Work». HowStuffWorks (en inglés). 5 de febrero de 2008. Consultado el 3 de abril de 2020. 
  5. «How I Met Your Mother» |url= incorrecta con autorreferencia (ayuda). Wikipedia (en inglés). 3 de abril de 2020. Consultado el 3 de abril de 2020.